Monday, January 07, 2008

deadly poisons, vipers, and celibacy

Suggestion: If a very inquisitive five-year-old shows up while you are reading and asks a series of questions covering roughly everything, it may not be the best idea to attempt to distract said child by reading Mark 16 aloud.

Check it out.

"So can I drink a deadly poison?"

Followed quickly by a series of questions about snakes, my mistaken attribution of an incident similar to Elisha's deadly stew in 2 Kings to Paul on Malta (I got the viper part right, though), more questions about why Paul's wife didn't fix the stew, why didn't he have a wife . . .

2 comments:

Mom of a certain Boyce student said...

Yeah, try explaining the word "violated" to an eight year old who attempted to read through the bible. You know what King David's son did to his half sister.

Daniel Jackson said...

I'm convinced that Bible stories would lose 90% of the drama if only all of the men had loving wives who would make good stew for them. Good stew made by a caring woman keeps more men out of trouble than most people realize.
(See esp. Jacob and Esau. See also: The garden, Cain and Abel, Joseph and Potiphar's wife, etc.)
Basically, a woman's homemade stew serves as some sort of sacramental sign of the covenant of God's grace (Beginning immediately after the fall, but carried right into the Mosaic law) and therefore must be administered by the designated priestly order--but I'm getting off on a tangent here, I think...